Smith

SAMUEL SMITH [1728-1798]
Samuel Smith was one of the founders. of The Sugar Loaf, a successful wholesale grocery in London, which imported sugar, tea and spices from all over the world.  Buying property in the West Indies, and the Southern States of America.  By 1757, the firm was worth 70,000, and by 1761, the brothers were receiving 4,000 a year income.

He married Martha Adams [1759-1734], who came from a wealthy family and had a dowry on her marriage of six thousand pounds. She died following the birth of their last child in 1759, around the same time an infant daughter died of smallpox, William was the only one of their three children to survive childhood.

Children of Samuel Smith and Martha Adams: William [1756-1835]

WILLIAM SMITH [1756-1835]
Son of Samuel Smith and Martha Adams.

William joined the family business, as he was the sole heir to the Smith fortune, his mother Martha had come from a wealthy family, and William was the only surviving heir. In 1779 after inheriting money from his Uncle Adams on the Isle of Wight, William withdrew from the business to make room for his cousins Travers Adams and Kemble Smith

The Smiths lived at Clapham Common, where William met Frances Coape [1759-1840], who was from an old and wealthy Nottingham Dissenting family. In 1781 they married, and had ten children lived in Eagle House, on the west side of the Common opposite the Windmill Inn. They also had a country estate, Parndon Hall, near Harlow in Essex, with 200 acres of land. In 1794, he took a town house in Westminster, 6 Park Street [now 16 Queen Anne’s Gate].

He served as MP for Norwich from 1802 to 1830, except for a gap in 1806-1807. From 1805-1832 he served as Chairman of the Dissenting Deputies, a committee of Presbyterians, Independents and Baptist, established in 1732 to take care of the civil affairs of Dissenters. He directed negotiations for the broadening of the Toleration Act.

In 1804 his Uncle Benjamin died leaving him £60,000. He entered into partnership with Messrs Cooke and Tate, who ran a whisky distillery and brewery at Millbank. In 1806 a fire destroyed much of the distillery, which William discovered was under insured. His eldest son Ben took charge of the business, with brother Octavius. Another son Adams was not so successful in business. William had set up yet another firm with Adams and his Kemble cousins in charge, in Philpot Lane.  Between them they had brought the firm to the point of bankruptcy by 1819. Ben rescued the firm, with money from the distillery business, but it was liquidated in 1823. Williams eldest son, Ben, had a better financial head than his father.

William had to sell first his library, then his painting collection, and both of his houses. Ben leased a town house, 5 Blandford Square, St Marylebone, and moved his parents into it. He took over financial responsibility for his unmarried Patty and Julia, also Adams.

William Smith died on 31 May 1835, and is buried at St Jame’s Church Bermondsey.

Children of William Smith and Frances Coape:  Matha Frances [1782-1870], Anne [1785-1854], William Adams [1789-1870], Joanna Maria [1791-1884], Benjamin [1783-1860], Frances [1788-1880], Samuel [1794-1880], Octavius [1796-1871], Frederick [1798-1882], and Julia [1799-1883].

ANNE SMITH [1785-1854]
The daughter of William Smith and Frances Coape, she married George Thomas Nicholson [1787-1852].

Children of George Thomas Nicholson and Anne Smith: Laura Maria [1844-1859], William Smith [1817-1896], Marrianne [1818-1909], Henry [ -1850], Samuel [1815-],Lothian [1827-1893].

FRANCES SMITH [1788-1880]
The daughter of William Smith and Frances Coape, she married William Edward Nightingale. They had 2 children: Frances Pathenope and Florence.

Children of William Edward Nightingale and Frances Smith:  Frances Pathenope [1819-1890], Florence [1820-1910].

WILLIAM ADAMS SMITH [1789-1870]
The son of William Smith and Frances Coape. He was named after his Mothers maiden name [Adams].

JOANNA MARIA SMITH [1791-1884]
The daughter of William Smith and Frances Coape, she married John Bonham Carter.  [They had 9/10children]

Children of John Bonham Carter and Joanna Maria Smith: Henry [1827-1921], Joanna Hilary [1821-1865], John [1817-1884], Alice [1828-1912], Alfred [1825-1910], Hugh [1832[0]-1896], Frances Maria [1823[2]-1870], Eleanor Mary [1837-1923],Thomas [1819-1829].

MATHA FRANCES SMITH [1782-1870]
The daughter of William Smith and Frances Coape.  Known as Aunt Patty, she was named after her Mother.  She did not marry.

BENJAMIN SMITH [1793-1860]
The son of William Smith and Frances Coape. Benjamin Smith was educated at Knox’s school Tunbridge, and then Hackney.

He met Anne Longden who was a 25 year old milliner from Alfreton.  She became pregnant and he took her to a rented lodge at Whatlington, in Sussex. There she lived as Mrs Leigh, the surname of his relations on the Isle of Wight.

The family went to America in 1828, for two years.  On their return to England they lived in Sussex at Brown`s Farm.  By 1833 Anne had become ill and Ben took her to Pelham Place in Hastings, for the fresh sea air. Later that year he took her to Ryde on the Isle of Wight, she died on 30 August 1834.  The record of her burial, in the name of Anne Smith states only that she died at Ryde, no home address.  She was buried at St. Edmunds Church Wooton.  He never married Ann, they had 5 children.

He was elected MP for Norwich and while at the House of Commons, he asked his wifes Aunt Dolly Longden or Aunt Julia Smith to look after his children.

During the 1840`s he bought more land to the south and west of Robertsbridge, including Scalands Farm, Mountfield Park Farm and Glottenham Manor, Crowham Manor and Brown`s Farm.  When each of his children reached 21, he gave each of them investments which bought an annual income of £300. He also gave Barbara the deeds of the Westminster school.

In 1804 his Fathers’ Uncle Benjamin died leaving him £60,000. He entered into partnership with Messrs Cooke and Tate, who ran a whisky distillery and brewery at Millbank. In 1806 a fire destroyed much of the distillery, which William discovered was under insured. His eldest son Ben took charge of the business, with brother Octavius. Another son Adams was not so successful in business. William had set up yet another firm with Adams and his Kemble cousins in charge, in Philpot Lane.  Between them they had brought the firm to the point of bankruptcy by 1819. Ben rescued the firm, with money from the distillery business, but it was liquidated in 1823. Williams eldest son, Benjamin, had a better financial head than his father.

His Father had to sell his library, then his painting collection, and both of his houses. Benjamin leased a town house, 5 Blandford Square, St Marylebone, and moved his parents into it. He took over financial responsibility for his unmarried Patty and Julia, also Adams

Benjamin Leigh Smith’s property was divided up before he died between his children Barbara, 5 Blandford Square, Benjamin the Glottenham Estates which included the ruins of a 14th century fortified house surrounded by a moat, William Crowham Manor, Anne property in Bath Street, and Isabella had £5,000 in lieu of property on her marriage, as her husband had his own property.

Benjamin also had 3 other children named Bentley Smith, in Fulham. It appears that he had taken a mistress two years after Anne’s death. All three children were educated at schools in Hampshire and Kent.

She was born in 1802 to a family of agricultural labourer’s in Froxfield, close to Joanna Bonham Carter’s house, Ditcham Grove in Hampshire. The 1881 census shows Jane Bentley Smith living in Hammersmith married to John Cross, a Ditcham surveyor of taxes, with nine children and one general servant. Living with them was her younger brother Henry a mariner.

The words on his memorial stone read:

‘He was an ardent advocate of civil and religious liberty and of every
measure which could promote the well-being of mankind.  He supported
for 29 years the first Infant School in England. He gave hearty and
generous assistance to migration.  He loved the arts and sciences and
was an active friend to their diffusion among the people’

Children of Benjamin Smith and Ann Longden:  Anne [183-], Barbara [1827-1891], Isabella [1830-1873], William [1833-] Benjamin [1828-1913]
Children of Benjamin Smith and Ann Buss:  Jane [1837-], Alexander [1838-] Henry [1839-][Bentley Smith]

SAMUEL SMITH [1794-1880]
The son of William Smith and Frances Coape, he married Mary Shore, sister of William Edward Nightingale.

Children of Samuel Smith and Mary Shore: Beatrice [1835[3]-], William [1831-1894], Blanche [1828-1904] Bertha [1833[2]-]

OCTAVIUS SMITH [1796-1871]
The son of William Smith and Frances Coape, he married Jane [Joan]Cooke, the daughter of one of his former business partners, in 1819.

He was educated at Trinity College Cambridge.

When he retired from the Thames Bank Distillery, Grosvenor Road, Westminster, he became the paternalistic landowner of Ardtornish estate in the West Highlands, building model houses while his wife set up an infant school.

Children of Octavius Smith and Jane Cooke: Frederick [-1839], Valentine, William, Gertrude, Flora, Gerard [-1858]and Edith

FREDERICK SMITH [1798-1882]
Frederick Smith, was the son of William Smith and Frances Coape.  He had a commission in the Indian army, had become involved with a woman regarded as unsuitable in India, and who was now threatening to turn up in England with her two children. His sisters Patty and Fanny judged that if Frederick wants to live with his amour, he had better settle in Van Diemen`s Land; the colonies were evidently seen by them as the place where irregularities could be discreetly covered up. [1834]

JULIA SMITH [1799-1883]
The daughter of William Smith and Frances Coape. She did not marry.

Julia supported Bedford College by serving as a member of the council for a year and as a lady visitor for five years. Bedford College was non-residential and largely concentrated on making up for deficiencies in earlier education.

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3 thoughts on “Smith

  1. I am researching the life of the London grocer and philosopher Jackson Barwis who, as it turns out, was a close friend of William Smith. For years I have been trying to work out why Barwis’s granddaughter Mary Wyatt died in Little Parndon, I even went to Harlow Museum to try to find out more about the area. Now, thanks to your site, it all makes sense. I have also found evidence that Barwis was still a regular visitor at Parndon House in 1798 when Mary would have been 8 years old. I imagine that Barwis’s daughter Jayne and her children also visited Little Parndon and that Mary decided to go there in later life because she had happy memories of weekends away as a child.

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